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Welcome to Our Recipes Page

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Broiled Bluefish Fillets with Fennel

Broiled Sea Trout with Basil Sauce

Cracker Crumb Bluefish Filets

Fish Stock

Fish Tacos with Chipotle Sauce

Grilled Striped Bass

Grilled Tuna and Mango Salad

Grilled Tuna with Pineapple Salsa

Italian Style Baked Haddock

Mahattan Clam Chowder

Maple Soy Glazed Mackerel

Mussel Soup

New England Clam Chowder

New England Fish Chowder

Poached Cod

Roast Goose

Roasted Striped Bass

Saco Bay Brick House Chile

Shark Bite Salsa

Shrimp Skewers

Sour Mustard Pickles

Striper Ceviche

Wood Island Clam Chowder

New England Fish Chowder print link

4 ounces meaty salt pork, rind removed and cut into 1/3-inch dice

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 medium onions (14 ounces), cut into 3/4-inch dice

6 to 8 sprigs fresh summer savory or thyme, leaves removed and chopped (1 tablespoon)

2 dried bay leaves

2 pounds Yukon Gold, Maine, PEI, or other all-purpose potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/3-inch thick

5 cups Strong Fish Stock, Traditional Fish Stock, Chicken Stock, or water (as a last resort)

Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 pounds skinless haddock or cod fillets, preferably over 1 inch thick, pinbones removed

1 1/2 cups heavy cream (or up to 2 cups if desired)

For garnish

2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley

2 tablespoons minced fresh chives

1. Heat a 4- to 6-quart heavy pot over low heat and add the diced salt pork. Once it has rendered a few tablespoons of fat, increase the heat to medium and cook until the pork is a crisp golden brown. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cracklings to a small ovenproof dish, leaving the fat in the pot, and reserve until later.

2. Add the butter, onions, savory or thyme, and bay leaves to the pot and sauté, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, for about 8 minutes, until the onions and softened but not browned.

3. Add the potatoes and stock. If the stock doesn'#over the potatoes, add just enough water to cover them. Turn up the heat and bring to a boil, cover, and cook the potatoes vigorously for about 10 minutes, until they are soft on the outside but still firm in the center. If the stock hasn'4hickened lightly, smash a few of the potato slices against the side of the pot and cook for a minute or two longer to release their starch. Reduce the heat to low and season assertively with salt and pepper (you want to almost overseason the chowder at this point to avoid having to stir it much once the fish is added). Add the fish fillets and cook over low heat for 5 minutes, then remove the pot from the heat and allow the chowder to sit for 10 minutes (the fish will finish cooking during this time).

4. Gently stir in the cream and taste for salt and pepper. If you are not serving the chowder within the hour, let it cool a bit, then refrigerate; cover the chowder after it has chilled completely. Otherwise, let it sit for up to an hour at room temperature, allowing the flavors to meld.

5. When ready to serve, reheat the chowder over low heat; don't let it boil. Warm the cracklings in a low oven (200 °F) for a few minutes.

6. Use a slotted spoon to mound the chunks of fish, the onions, and potatoes in the center of large soup plates or shallow bowls, and ladle the creamy broth around. Scatter the cracklings over the individual servings and finish each with a sprinkling of chopped parsley and minced chives.


Notes

Cod and haddock are very similar, but large haddock is just a little firmer and doesn't reek up quite as much as cod, making it easier to produce a chowder with large chunks of fish. But even more important than the type of fish is the way you prepare it. Both cod and haddock, and their cousins pollock and hake, all flake apart naturally. Therefore,  it isn't necessary to cut them into pieces. Simply add the whole fillets to the chowder, cook it a few minutes longer, and remove it from the heat, without stirring it again. When you reheat the chowder, the fillets will break into lovely big chunks of tender white fish. Most fish can be used for New England Fish Chowder, but if the fish you choose is not native to New England, then your chowder should be called "New England style." Depending on their tendency to break up naturally, some fish need to be cut into pieces.

Strong Fish Stock made with the heads and bones from the cod or haddock you buy for chowder is by far the best choice for this recipe. I urge you to make it, but if you can'4here are alternatives listed in the recipe.

For equipment, you will need a 4- to 6-quart heavy pot with a lid, a slotted spoon, a wooden spoon, and a ladle.

Makes about 14 cups; serves 8 as a main course.